Tuesday, August 5, 2014

Fanatical Gun Activist, Alan Gottlieb, Compares Firearm Registration To Nazi Tattooing Of Jews



Media Matters

After a National Rifle Association lobbyist equated a proposal to expand background checks to the Nazi policies of Adolf Hitler, a prominent guns rights activist defended the offensive comparison and took it further, comparing gun registration to the Nazi practice of tattooing Jews with identification numbers.

The NRA is under fire after its Washington state lobbyist Brian Judy was heard telling opponents of the state's background check proposal that one of the proposal's primary supporters, who is Jewish, is "stupid" because "he's put half-a-million dollars toward this policy, the same policy that led to his family getting run out of Germany by the Nazis." Judy went on to mock the intelligence of Jewish individuals who support gun safety.

Now Alan Gottlieb, founder of the Second Amendment Foundation (SAF) and the chairman of the Citizens Committee for the Right to Keep and Bear Arms (CCRKBA), is coming to Judy's defense.

Gottlieb reacted to Judy's comments on Seattle's CBS affiliate, saying "I don't see anything wrong with those remarks," before comparing the "registration" of Jews with number tattoos during the Holocaust to firearm registration:
ESSEX PORTER, KIRO 7: You're Jewish, are those remarks appropriate?

GOTTLIEB: I don't see anything wrong with those remarks. I mean it's a historical fact that Adolf Hitler registered people's firearms and then confiscated them.

PORTER: Gottlieb says many gun owners see it this way.

GOTTLIEB: Gun owners don't like the idea that Jewish people had to have, you know, numbers tattooed and registered on their arms. They don't like the fact that they have gun owners that get registered either.

24 comments:

  1. The article should have noted that Alan Gottlieb is a convicted felon.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, that is correct. He also has had his rights restored by the legal process and your trivia has no value in this or any discussion.

      Delete
  2. "The article should have noted that Alan Gottlieb is a convicted felon."

    Yes, he was convicted of underpaying taxes. He did his time. Paid restitution, and then petitioned and regained his right to possess firearms.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The vast majority of tax cheats have no criminal proceedings against them. They usually just pay a fine and are subject to IRS audit for a short period of time. Misdemeanor tax cheats are, obviously, more serious. You get a fine, maybe some probation.

      Gottlieb is a felon. He went to prison. His crime was quite a bit more serious than just fudging on his taxes.

      Delete
    2. "He had to petition to get back his right to own a firearm after serving just under nine months in 1984 in work-release for filing a false income-tax return (he also paid $17,000 in back taxes plus a $5,000 fine).
      Says Gottlieb, “It should have been a civil matter, and not a criminal matter. For that low dollar amount it never goes criminal. The Internal Revenue Service wanted to use me to intimidate others because of my high profile.”

      http://seattletimes.com/html/localnews/2022275977_alangottliebxml.html

      I'm not knowledgeable as to what level brings it into prison territory. But then he isn't being paid to do peoples' taxes now. And as I said, the courts determined he paid his dues and rated regaining his rights.
      And it was nearly thirty years ago, with what I imagine to be a period of audits to insure he's keeping his nose clean. If the justice system has seen fit to return his rights as a citizen, should we not go along with that?

      Delete
    3. The man is a nut job on the same level of Nugent. He is a convicted felon and that record should follow him the rest of his life, just as other convicted felons who have served their time are shunned by society, can't get a job etc., etc.............

      Delete
    4. http://jpfo.org/articles-assd04/kenyon-judy-was-right.htm

      Delete
    5. Comparing the poor persecuted gun owners to the poor persecuted Jews of the '30s and '40s is one of the stupidest themes you guys have. Only desperate and fanatical gun rights advocates use this, and I suspect that even they don't fully believe it.

      Delete
    6. The current attacks on the civil rights of gun owners is much more serious that you seem to admit. People are going to prison for made up gun offenses. See the current woman that is likely to spend prison time in NJ for accidentally entering NJ with a legally owned and safely stored gun.
      If you carefully look at the statements from these extreme gun control people, it is clear that they would like to harm or kill if they could find a way. Many of these "gun control" groups have really very violent and viscous claims. How many threats are made against the families of NRA members and leaders? lots
      It also should be noted that people that actually own and carry guns, do not make such threats.

      Delete
    7. "He is a convicted felon and that record should follow him the rest of his life, just as other convicted felons who have served their time are shunned by society, can't get a job etc., etc............."

      His record isn't going away Anon. However, he has regained the rights normally lost by someone who is convicted of a felony. Are you suggesting that felons should have no path to becoming a contributor to society? Or are you just wanting that for people you don't approve of?
      If there is no path to leading a productive life in lawful pursuits, then you are guaranteeing their return to criminal ones.

      Delete
    8. I'm only suggesting that he be treated as other felons are treated in society, even after they have paid their debt. I don't make societies rules, but I do wonder why some get a pass.
      Are you suggesting that because he paid his debt that proves he is a great example of a citizen with an A-1 character? As someone once said, there is a sucker born every minute. We know how great our prison system is at rehabilitation achievements. (HA HA). Comparing gun registration to Nazis tattooing Jews, is a productive persuit?

      Delete
    9. "I'm only suggesting that he be treated as other felons are treated in society, even after they have paid their debt. I don't make societies rules, but I do wonder why some get a pass."

      My guess is that all felons have the right to petition whatever jurisdiction convicted them. Its also likely expensive. And the jurisdictions likely have limits as to what crimes they'll consider. And of course, how law abiding they've been after serving their sentence. It isn't a free pass.
      Gottlieb has been a law abiding person for the nearly thirty years since his sentence was served. Except of course for him saying things that you don't approve of. Fortunately, the Constitution protects that.

      Delete
    10. Considering the idiotic logic of the gun loons you support and the lies you tell to make your points, I know I'm right when you support this kind of idiot who compares gun registration to Nazis tattooing Jews. Yes, I disagree with that thinking and I wonder why you do not? Yes, the constitution protects bigotry and other vile speech, but responsible citizens have a responsibility to speak out against such idiotic hate and those like you who feel they can break rules simply because you disagree with them. Now it's time for you to grab you gun and go to Target just to tell the CEO of Target that you refuse to follow his rules regarding his stores and his companies property. Don't forget it's one of Targets rules that you pay for their merchandise.

      Delete
    11. "Now it's time for you to grab you gun and go to Target just to tell the CEO of Target that you refuse to follow his rules regarding his stores and his companies property. "

      Actually, its on record that Target isn't banning guns from their stores. I've cited that before. Since the CEO hasn't set an official policy in place and posted according to local laws as they have every right to do, then it isn't an issue.

      Delete
    12. The willfully blind Texas TopCat had this gem to offer: "It also should be noted that people that actually own and carry guns, do not make such threats." I guess he doesn't read this blog very often and just drops in to dispense his wisdom from time to time.

      Delete
    13. Target's CEO statement was very clear, you just refuse to follow rules. It doesn't matter what anyone says, you will bring your gun anywhere you please. A true gun loon.

      Delete
    14. "Target's CEO statement was very clear, you just refuse to follow rules."

      We can surely do this again Anon. Again, they are on record that there is no ban of lawful carry,

      "Still, Target won’t post signs at its doors asking customers not to bring guns inside, said Molly Snyder, a Target spokeswoman."

      “It is not a ban,” she said. “There is no prohibition.”

      http://www.startribune.com/business/265535731.html

      So I'm not breaking any rules at all. If they do decide to post in accordance to local law, or if for whatever reason an employee comes up to me and asks me to leave, I will.

      The Target spokesperson quoted above works for the CEO. So certainly, they must be on the same sheet of music. I certainly didn't read any correction that said the spokesperson was wrong.
      And I believe I've mentioned before, I go into Target maybe twice a year. If they ever decide to legally post, that will drop to zero. Until then, its just like any other place that is legal to carry in.

      Delete
    15. ss, do you also carry in Chipotle's and in Starbucks? How about a private residence whose owner asks you not to bring your weapon? It seems to me that any and all requests to not carry should be honored, not just those that carry the weight of law.

      Delete
    16. Only a true gun loon plays such games. A rational person would respect peoples requests and rules without it being a law. I think the CEO represents a companies announcements more than one of his underlings. I take it you don't follow any requests from your military superiors unless it is a law passed by a legislative body. I wonder how many doors it would take to post all rules in the military that have not been passed by a legislative body. If your commander tells you his rule for behavior in the mess hall, will you defy his rules because his aide says something opposite, or defy his rule because it is not posted on the mess hall door? Stop being childish, irrational, and disingenuous in your debate tactics.

      Delete
    17. "I take it you don't follow any requests from your military superiors unless it is a law passed by a legislative body. I wonder how many doors it would take to post all rules in the military that have not been passed by a legislative body."

      Your comment shows pretty clearly that you hold no grasp of military discipline or where military authority comes from.
      The person quoted wasn't Joe from accounting, it was the official spokesperson. Someone who officially represents the company and was assigned to answer questions the press might have about the CEO's statement. Certainly if there was a mistake there would have been an official correction made.

      Delete
    18. So you accept any statement from an underling compared to the CEO, figures. The CEO IS the official spokesperson for a company. Point is you have to use twisting words and lies to make your points, an automatic loss.

      Delete
  3. There's a very interesting book out now by an author/researcher who has no dog in the race for gun control. I found it fascinating.

    http://www.amazon.com/Gun-Control-Third-Reich-Disarming/dp/1598131621

    ReplyDelete
  4. Actually, Gottlieb plea bargained for a lesser charge, So, even his protestations that he was a victim are false.

    ReplyDelete