Thursday, October 6, 2011

RIP, Steve Jobs

11 comments:

  1. I guess it was expected, but I'm so sorry to hear it.

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  2. He changed so much of what we do, ipods, ipads, etc.

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  3. Shall not be infringedOctober 6, 2011 at 8:27 AM

    All with the power of capitalism..... the horrors!!!!

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  4. Ah, fringe face, yet again you display your ignorance of how what you call capitalism works. There were plenty of ways in which this was not accomplished through what you would like to identify as capitalism, but was instead supported by both government and society.

    So.......isthis your idea of capitalism, fringie?

    Because it looks to me like a business that is run, at least in part, by using communist labor, in the worst sense of the term.

    Not to mention that this passage from the Jobs entry on Wikipedia hardly describes the notion of traditional U.S. style capitalism...

    "In autumn 1974, Jobs returned to California and began attending meetings of the Homebrew Computer Club with Wozniak. He took a job as a technician at Atari, a manufacturer of popular video games, with the primary intent of saving money for a spiritual retreat to India.

    Jobs then traveled to India to visit the Neem Karoli Baba[43] at his Kainchi Ashram with a Reed College friend (and, later, the first Apple employee), Daniel Kottke, in search of spiritual enlightenment. He came back a Buddhist with his head shaved and wearing traditional Indian clothing.[44][45] During this time, Jobs experimented with psychedelics, calling his LSD experiences "one of the two or three most important things [he had] done in [his] life".[46] He later said that people around him who did not share his countercultural roots could not fully relate to his thinking.[46]"

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  5. Are you enjoying the enormous growth and success of the Occupy Wall Street protests Fringie?

    Gosh,they don't seem to have gone away at all. No, they're just getting bigger.....and bigger........and bigger.

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  6. Actually, Apple was one of the more lefty of the personal computer companies. It embodied the hacker culture and was fairly collective.

    Of course, it did become monopolistic toward the end with the iPod, iPhone,iPad, etc.

    Can hacker coexist with luddite?

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  7. "Of course, it did become monopolistic toward the end with the iPod, iPhone,iPad, etc."

    I would say Apple has been monopolistic all along. The only time it did licenses its products out was when Jobs was not at the helm and he nixed that as soon as he returned.

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  8. Shall not be infringedOctober 6, 2011 at 10:54 PM

    Because it looks to me like a business that is run, at least in part, by using communist labor, in the worst sense of the term.

    What does that have to do with the price of tea in China?

    Jobs was a corporate capitalist, he sent his ideas to China to be produced as cheaply as possible, to maximize the profit for his shareholders.

    End of story, He did not and Apple does not care one whit about the social ramification of their decisions, they would not send their ideas to China to be manufactured if they did.

    Not to mention that this passage from the Jobs entry on Wikipedia hardly describes the notion of traditional U.S. style capitalism...

    OK, So jobs was a wacky liberal corporate capitalist, so what.

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  9. The labor in China is not just cheap; it is coercive.

    REAL capitalism depends on a FREE market for labor as well as for material, goods, and services. Further, a free market, and authentic capitalism does not involve rigged markets and rigged currencies.

    What you have with Jobs is a man who had some brilliant innovative ideas, but who brought in other corporate-type executives to do what you describe as 'the power of capitalism'. It wasn't capitalism, it was an authoritarian aided, exploitive rigged system that was not capitalism.

    You need to learn what capitalism is - and is not. Fringie, you consistently demonstrate the most superficial grasp of subjects, with a depth of ignorance underlying it that is truly sad. Your further failure to look more closely at the real history, not myths, about Apple, BOTH good and bad, are part of what is wrong with your comments.

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  10. FWM, you obviously weren't too familiar with the Apple II, which was pretty much a hobbyist's computer. The Apple II series was Apple's primary revenue source for most of the following decade. At its peak, it was a billion-dollar-a-year industry with its associated community of third-party developers and retailers. The Apple IIGS was sold until the end of 1992; the last II-series Apple in production, the IIe, was discontinued on October 15, 1993.

    The Mac changed apple's orientation and severly cost it market share. The fact that there is little Apple OS software is also a detriment to the company.

    Cool, fringy, maybe your job will get shipped overseas. Better yet, they hire someone on an H1-B visa for less money than they pay you. Let's see how oyu like that!

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  11. I posted a thing not too long ago about the profit on the new iPhone. The article said they could do the production and assembly in the States and still make big profits.

    The guy didn't become the success he is without doing some stuff like that which certainly could be criticized.

    But, I still liked him.

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