Saturday, September 3, 2011

Jacksonville FL - Crown Jewel of the Sunshine State

Eyewitnesses told police that Richardson, 20, and Billy Lorenzo Johnson, 31, arrived together at 1324 Prince Street around 4:30 p.m. and soon thereafter got into a physical confrontation with 26-year-old Kenneth E. Curry.

Police believe Richardson pulled a handgun, then so did Curry, and they began shooting at each other.

During the shooting, 19-year-old Danielle Dominique Melton and a toddler, Marc Smith, were shot, as was Johnson. Another person reported that Richardson fired into her apartment.

Just a couple days earlier this happened.

Ten people were wounded and an unborn child died in a hail of bullets in a neighborhood shooting near Riverside just before 9 p.m. The pregnant mother lost her 29-week unborn boy and an 18-month-old girl was in critical condition after the gunfire.

Six of the victims were women and three were men, all unidentified. A male victim remained at Shands Jacksonville hospital Monday.

Police were looking for at least two shooters Monday and did not say if they knew of a motive. No suspects have been identified.

One of the first things that comes to mind is the pro-gun argument that guns are not the problem. They say violent people are the problem and they always say that as if we don't agree with it. We do agree. We understand perfectly well that there are bad guys who do bad things and the gun does not make them do anything.

The problem is gun availability, and that's where the pro-gun guys themselves come into it. They are the source of the guns used in crime. They'll scream and yell and twist and lie and do everything possible to obscure that fact, but if you think about it, it's clear these guns used in Jacksonville shootings were not manufactured in some gang member's basement. They started out lawfully owned and somehow were allowed to flow into the criminal world.

In their enthusiasm to deny all responsibility for this problem, as a type of distraction, we often hear the ridiculous proposition that even if we removed all the guns, these violent criminals would use other weapons to do the same thing.

I wonder how that would have worked in Jacksonville. Would as many people have been wounded and killed if no guns had been used? That's a rhetorical question, you don't have to answer.

Florida continues to wear the crown and Jacksonville is one of its most precious jewels.

What's your opinion?  Please leave a comment.

1 comment:

  1. And that incident was in no way related to the shootings, a few evenings prior of 11 people in a different Jacksonville neighborhood--well, except for all 15 people being, y'know, shot.

    Forgive me for going off on a tangent her. I haven't been in Phoenix for a while but I suspect that they still have an anti-cruising ordinance in effect. That law, IIRC, defined cruising as going past the same spot at a mall or some other public place, more than three times in a given amount of time. This law was, at the time, rather draconian and ambiguous and, quelle horreur, used by some in LE as an excuse to pull over automobiles full of wrongfullycolored folks.

    There was, during the periods I spent in Phoenix visiting family, no spate of mall or 7/11 shootings or drive-by running over of large groups of people.

    Despite, however, evidence that a lot of folks get shot in Phoenix there is no similar ordinance addressing assholez wit gunz.